New Orleans Museum of Art

Founded in 1910 and opened in 1911, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the city's oldest fine arts institution, has a magnificent permanent collection of more than 35,000 objects.
Just a friendly reminder of what today is all about… Happy Valentine’s Day!

Just a friendly reminder of what today is all about… Happy Valentine’s Day!

HAPPY MARDI GRAS!

Just a reminder, we close at 6 p.m. today, 3 p.m. tomorrow (Saturday), and we’re closed all day on Tuesday.

This image is from a 1977 installation called “Louisiana Prop Piece” by Lynda Benglis and her former teacher, Ida Kohlmeyer. They transported all of these unused Mardi Gras props from floatmaker Blaine Kern’s studio, and arranged them all over NOMA’s Great Hall.

LAST DAY OF LIFELIKE! Plenty of time to stop by before the game! Object spotlight: Ron Mueck’s “Crouching Boy in Mirror” This piece is a staff (and visitor) favorite. Ron Mueck got his start in visual art working in special effects. His sculptures of human figures are strange and uncanny, with a distorted scale. The “Crouching Boy” looks realistic, but in person the viewer realizes how small he is. Peering into a mirror, he captures the viewer in his reflection, and the effect is unnerving.

LAST DAY OF LIFELIKE! Plenty of time to stop by before the game!

Object spotlight: Ron Mueck’s “Crouching Boy in Mirror”

This piece is a staff (and visitor) favorite. Ron Mueck got his start in visual art working in special effects. His sculptures of human figures are strange and uncanny, with a distorted scale. The “Crouching Boy” looks realistic, but in person the viewer realizes how small he is. Peering into a mirror, he captures the viewer in his reflection, and the effect is unnerving.

3 days left to see Lifelike! Object spotlight: Paul Sietsema’s “Untitled ink drawing” The source of this self-portrait is a picture the artist discovered of himself on the Internet. Sietsema then zoomed in on the photo, and and as he says, “found the pixel formation to be compelling.” He replicated each pixel in ink, by hand.  Sietsema says, “I liked the idea of making a self-portrait that was actually an image taken by someone else, put into the slipstream of the Internet—a highly public and arguably impersonal place—and then appropriated back by me… the drawing was pieced together not laboriously so, probably more meditatively…”

3 days left to see Lifelike!

Object spotlight: Paul Sietsema’s “Untitled ink drawing”

The source of this self-portrait is a picture the artist discovered of himself on the Internet. Sietsema then zoomed in on the photo, and and as he says, “found the pixel formation to be compelling.” He replicated each pixel in ink, by hand.

Sietsema says, “I liked the idea of making a self-portrait that was actually an image taken by someone else, put into the slipstream of the Internet—a highly public and arguably impersonal place—and then appropriated back by me… the drawing was pieced together not laboriously so, probably more meditatively…”

4 days left to see Lifelike!
Object spotlight: Kaz Oshiro’s “Dumpster (Flesh with Turquoise Swoosh)”, 2011. Acrylic on canvas, caster wheels The artist says, “This dumpster for Lifelike is the fifth that I have made… I like the dumpster because I can experiment with the idea of abstract painting… The work appears to be representational painting, but I am always thinking of it as abstract painting, with the details of paint drips, dust, and rust… I see myself as a still life painter who’s trying to be an abstract painter; I think the dumpster shows this transition.”

4 days left to see Lifelike!

Object spotlight: Kaz Oshiro’s “Dumpster (Flesh with Turquoise Swoosh)”, 2011. Acrylic on canvas, caster wheels

The artist says, “This dumpster for Lifelike is the fifth that I have made… I like the dumpster because I can experiment with the idea of abstract painting… The work appears to be representational painting, but I am always thinking of it as abstract painting, with the details of paint drips, dust, and rust… I see myself as a still life painter who’s trying to be an abstract painter; I think the dumpster shows this transition.”

6 days left to see Lifelike! Object spotlight: Keith Edmier’s “Bremen Towne” (detail)This is part of Edmier’s sculptural re-creation of the home in suburban Chicago where he grew up in the 1970s. With his dogged pursuit of authenticity, Edmier not only creates a surreal period room, but in the process reclaims his past with this revisionist self-portrait.The artist says: “I think I was initially interested in doing that to have some kind of separation from taking a real object that was loaded with personal history or some sentimental thing. It was a way of moving from a subjective to an objective position.”

6 days left to see Lifelike!

Object spotlight: Keith Edmier’s “Bremen Towne” (detail)

This is part of Edmier’s sculptural re-creation of the home in suburban Chicago where he grew up in the 1970s. With his dogged pursuit of authenticity, Edmier not only creates a surreal period room, but in the process reclaims his past with this revisionist self-portrait.

The artist says: “I think I was initially interested in doing that to have some kind of separation from taking a real object that was loaded with personal history or some sentimental thing. It was a way of moving from a subjective to an objective position.”

10 days left to see Lifelike! Come tonight for a walk-through of the exhibition with Maxx Sizeler.Object spotlight: Susan Collis’ “Refugee,” 2007"Refugee" may look like an ordinary paper shopping bag, but it is hand-constructed and hand-drawn. All of the lines you see on it were made using ballpoint pen or pencil. Collis says, "[The work] doesn’t rely on any precious material; it is almost the opposite, it is more about the labor and time expended."

10 days left to see Lifelike! Come tonight for a walk-through of the exhibition with Maxx Sizeler.

Object spotlight: Susan Collis’ “Refugee,” 2007

"Refugee" may look like an ordinary paper shopping bag, but it is hand-constructed and hand-drawn. All of the lines you see on it were made using ballpoint pen or pencil. Collis says, "[The work] doesn’t rely on any precious material; it is almost the opposite, it is more about the labor and time expended."

Art critic and journalist Linda Yablonsky will give a public lecture at NOMA tomorrow night on the work of Jim Richard. Yablonsky writes for T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Artforum, and other national publications. Her lecture begins at 6 p.m. in the Stern Auditorium.

Art critic and journalist Linda Yablonsky will give a public lecture at NOMA tomorrow night on the work of Jim Richard. Yablonsky writes for T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Artforum, and other national publications. Her lecture begins at 6 p.m. in the Stern Auditorium.

Visitor comment of the day, on Lifelike: “I appreciate everyday objects even more than I had before. Everything is art.”
Object: Alex Hay | Paper Bag, 1968 

Visitor comment of the day, on Lifelike: “I appreciate everyday objects even more than I had before. Everything is art.”

Object: Alex Hay | Paper Bag, 1968 

2012 was an amazing year for art at NOMA. Look at what these folks had to say:
Gambit Weekly: “If surging attendance, strong finances and high visibility are any gauge, NOMA may have entered a golden age.”
The Times-Picayune: “In 2012, a membership at the New Orleans Museum of Art paid off especially well.”
What are some of your favorite NOMA memories from this year?

2012 was an amazing year for art at NOMA. Look at what these folks had to say:

Gambit Weekly: “If surging attendance, strong finances and high visibility are any gauge, NOMA may have entered a golden age.”

The Times-Picayune: “In 2012, a membership at the New Orleans Museum of Art paid off especially well.”

What are some of your favorite NOMA memories from this year?